“Discourse on the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men” Part 2 by Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1755)

“Discourse on the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men” Part 2 by Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1755) Part 2 The man who put up a fence around a plot of land & said “this is mine” was the founder of civil society. It should have been ignored but the natural way of life probably necessitated the… Read more “Discourse on the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men” Part 2 by Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1755)

“Discourse on the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men” Part 1 by Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1755)

“Discourse on the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1755) Dedication to Geneva I’m glad to be from Geneva & in this discourse I reflect on equality & inequality The best place to live is where: Society is proportionate to human limitations The sovereign & people’s interest are the same &… Read more “Discourse on the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men” Part 1 by Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1755)

“The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book IV (1762)

Book IV Chapter One: The General Will is Indestructible When an assembly is gathered, all are convened only to consider one will, the common good, which is apparent and only good sense is need to perceive it. This peace, unity and equality are at odds with political subtleties. Honest and simple men are difficult to… Read more “The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book IV (1762)

“The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book III (1762)

Book III Chapter One: Government in General Free action is based on two causes: Moral – the will that determines the act; and Physical – the power that executes the act. The legislative power is the moral cause based on the general will and is the sovereign. The executive power is the physical cause based… Read more “The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book III (1762)

“The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book II (1762)

Book II Chapter One: Sovereignty is inalienable The conclusion of Book I was that only the general will can direct the state’s forces based on the reason behind its establishment: the common good. Clashing interests create the necessity for societies but common interests allow them to continue. Society must only be governed by common interests.… Read more “The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book II (1762)

“The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book I (1762)

Book I Chapter One: Introduction “Man is born free and everywhere he is in chains.” With respect to force, people will obey if they are forced to. Without the chains of obedience or slavery, life would definitely be better. The former master and former slave may continue a relationship based on superiority-inferiority but force is… Read more “The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book I (1762)