“On Swift” by William Hazlitt (1778-1830)

“On Swift” by William Hazlitt (1778-1830) Swift’s ability as a poet is often overlooked because of his ability to write prose If he had never written “Tale of a Tub” or “Gulliver’s Travels”, he’d still be known as a poet Dry humor, agreeable morality, exquisite tone of irony, touching pathos blended with satire “Description of… Read more “On Swift” by William Hazlitt (1778-1830)

“Contentment” by Plutarch (46-120 AD)

“Contentment” by Plutarch (46-120 AD) How can money, reputation or power contribute to happiness & an untroubled life unless men find their presence agreeable & don’t always miss their absence What other than reason can restrain the irrational from getting out of control? Xenophon told us to be mindful of & honor the gods when… Read more “Contentment” by Plutarch (46-120 AD)

“The Character of Socrates” by Xenophon

“The Character of Socrates” by Xenophon Socrates always said what was on his mind to friends Also made sure that they were independent enough to pursue the avenues they were suited for He knew all his friends very well – often probing their minds w/ questions He taught his friends w/ all his heart the… Read more “The Character of Socrates” by Xenophon

“Of Youth & Age” by Francis Bacon (1561–1626)

Of Youth & Age – Francis Bacon Youth is a relative term Your mind is the real key But the youth tend to have a wilder imagination But some people are a bit too crazy & passionate to do anything productive Look at Caesar & Septimius Severus Septimius was known to be a wild child… Read more “Of Youth & Age” by Francis Bacon (1561–1626)

“Upon Some Verses of Virgil” by Michel de Montaigne (1580-1595)

“Upon Some Verses of Virgil” by Michel de Montaigne Montaigne is getting older and all he’s got left is to look back at life. He wants to live a comfortable life but wants to be temperate and moderate. This is difficult because comfort requires avoiding pain and that means going toward pleasure, the opposite of… Read more “Upon Some Verses of Virgil” by Michel de Montaigne (1580-1595)

“That the Relish of Good and Evil Depends in a Great Measure upon the Opinion We Have of Them” – Michel de Montaigne (1580-1595)

any That the Relish of Good and Evil Depends in a Great Measure upon the Opinion We Have of Them – Michel de Montaigne People are often bothered by their views on things, not the things themselves. We choose to see them as good or bad. If that’s so, why not choose to see things… Read more “That the Relish of Good and Evil Depends in a Great Measure upon the Opinion We Have of Them” – Michel de Montaigne (1580-1595)

“Of the Education of Children” by Michel de Montaigne (1580-1595)

Montaigne is asked by Madame Diane de Foix, on what the best way of educating a child is. He starts off saying he doesn’t know and then goes on for many pages on the best sort of education. It’s very difficult to read into what a child’s natural talents are and how to cultivate them.… Read more “Of the Education of Children” by Michel de Montaigne (1580-1595)

“Of Pedantry” by Michel de Montaigne (1580-1595)

“Of Pedantry” I was always annoyed, when watching Italian farces, to see the pedant (teacher, tutor) to be the complete idiot of the play. Perhaps it was because they just weren’t able to explain themselves to the rest of the characters but it seems that a lot of people are annoyed with pedantry. Even the… Read more “Of Pedantry” by Michel de Montaigne (1580-1595)