Federalist No. 3 – John Jay (1787-1788)

Federalist No. 3 – John Jay When deciding on a Constitution, consensus has to be taken into account to build a government strong enough for the general purposes of a government: prevention of invasion, suppressing insurrection and prosecuting crimes. The Constitution allows the government to deal with foreign threats and not appear weak to insiders… Read more Federalist No. 3 – John Jay (1787-1788)

Federalist No. 2 – John Jay (1787-1788)

Federalist No.2 – John Jay Q: Should we have just one federal government or many separate confederacies with multiple governments? The fate of America depends on staying united and giving its brightest citizens the chance to set up a good government. America is not a bunch of separate territories but physically connected, with ethnically similar… Read more Federalist No. 2 – John Jay (1787-1788)

Federalist No. 1 – Alexander Hamilton (1787-1788)

Federalist No. 1 – Alexander Hamilton The Articles of Confederation aren’t cutting it anymore. Things are unstable and might descend into chaos. Some people may benefit from the Confederation but it’s clear that most of us aren’t doing so well. The following series of Federalist papers focus on 6 major points: The utility of a… Read more Federalist No. 1 – Alexander Hamilton (1787-1788)

Articles of Confederation (1777-1781)

Articles of Confederation (1777-1781) Preamble and Article 1 New Hampshire, Massachusetts bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia are now a union called the United States of America Article 2 Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, independence, power and jurisdiction if… Read more Articles of Confederation (1777-1781)

“The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” Chapter 16 by Edward Gibbon (1776–1789)

“The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” Chapter 16 by Edward Gibbon The Conduct of the Roman Government Towards the Christians From the Reign of Nero to that of Constantine Christianity persecuted by the Roman Emperors – We don’t know why non-believers were so anti-Christian. But in the 80 years after Jesus’s death disciples… Read more “The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” Chapter 16 by Edward Gibbon (1776–1789)

Chapter 15 of “The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” by Edward Gibbon (1776–1789)

  The progress of Christian religion and the sentiments, manners, numbers and conditions of the primitive Christians Christianity is an essential part of Roman history because of its infiltration into Roman politics and power. Difficulties in inquiry Scanty and suspicious documents of church history make study of facts difficult. Must reveal imperfections of church history… Read more Chapter 15 of “The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” by Edward Gibbon (1776–1789)

“The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book IV (1762)

Book IV Chapter One: The General Will is Indestructible When an assembly is gathered, all are convened only to consider one will, the common good, which is apparent and only good sense is need to perceive it. This peace, unity and equality are at odds with political subtleties. Honest and simple men are difficult to… Read more “The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book IV (1762)

“The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book III (1762)

Book III Chapter One: Government in General Free action is based on two causes: Moral – the will that determines the act; and Physical – the power that executes the act. The legislative power is the moral cause based on the general will and is the sovereign. The executive power is the physical cause based… Read more “The Social Contract” by Jean-Jacques Rousseau Book III (1762)